Photographs on the Brain

Photographs on the Brain

Edited by Bryan Formhals

No one was really ever that mean to me on the internet. I never had that ‘thing’ that happens when you wake up one morning and somehow your life is ruined because a mortifying picture goes viral or a ‘funny’ tweet becomes horribly misread. Sure, there were bitchy things in the comments of videos, but organized trolls never unleashed a wave of death threats on me, and only a few people suggested that I kill myself. “So the internet never actually did that to me. But it did that to somebody. And now we all have this stupid crippling fear that someday it will happen to us. And the likelihood increases as you move from relative obscurity to becoming more broadly visible on the internet. There are more cameras on you, more chances to be quoted saying something stupid, and more people out there who relish seeing successful people disgraced and dethroned.”
Ash and Going Home
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eyecurious:

I just got my hands on two books, Going Home and Ash, by the Chinese photographer Muge. I had written about his work a few years ago based on images I saw online, but this is the first time I have seen his books. Both books were made in 2013 and they work as a pair. For Going Home, Muge photographed the route back along the Yangtze river to his hometown of Chongqing in the aftermath of the construction of the Three Gorges Dam. The book is made up primarily of portraits within landscapes: muted images invested with a palpable sense of fear for the future that is woven into the nostalgia of Muge’s return home. Ash is the more poetic of the two books, a series of loose plates of still lives and interiors that share the same dusty tonality of the former book. For Ash, Muge turned inwards, away from the portrait and the landscape, combining images in order to explore a specific atmosphere and emotion. Muge’s use of the square format at times reminds me of the Japanese photographer Issei Suda and, although he is still young (b. 1979), he seems to have more affinities with this older generation of photographers than with much of contemporary photography. His two books are great examples of the fact that, even today, things can still happen by simply taking a camera and going out into the world. 

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americanguide:

SMALL TOWN DINERS - INDIANA

Meals served in smartly fronted little restaurants and lunch stands retain the unmistakable tang of country cooking. 

Indiana: A Guide to the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

Small town diners in Indiana: stop in a good one and you will likely meet some incredible people; owners who love to cook and are adept at running a business on a shoestring. Small town cafes are personal spaces that reflect the ups and downs of their surrounding community.  They provide a central meeting spot and a sociable place to eat alone.

How to rate a café in the Hoosier state? If hand-breaded tenderloin and homemade pie are on the menu, your order will not disappoint.

Guide Notes:

—locations—

  1. Mary Ann Rubio, Family Café, Knox, IN
  2. The Grill, LaCrosse, IN
  3. Happy Days Café, Wakarusa, IN
  4. White House Hamburgers, Logansport, IN
  5. Hamlet Café, Hamlet, IN
  6. Crockpot Café, Walkerton, IN
  7. Teel’s Family Restaurant, Mentone, IN
  8. Northside Diner, Chesterton, IN
  9. The Nook, Columbia City, IN
  10. Woodland Inn, Woodland, IN

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Kay Westhues is a photographer based in South Bend, IN. Through her work she aims to describe the vitality and complexity of places and people whose lives are often overlooked and unexamined. She is inspired by the ways rural tradition and history are interpreted and transformed in the present day. You can see more of her work at kaywesthues.com or follow her latest project on tumblr (kwesthues.tumblr.com).

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

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