Photographs on the Brain

Photographs on the Brain

Edited by Bryan Formhals


"I have always been a storyteller and I am always working towards the book as the final work. It’s very hard to tell a story with those types of single stand-alone street images. I am interested in ideas. I am not interested in doing the same thing over and over again. The reason I take photographs is to make discoveries for myself. Always trying to piece together the puzzle, that’s where I get my rush. Once I find the answer I am looking for that’s usually it for a project, the excitement and energy is gone. I move onto something else, or away from that subject matter until I can view it with fresh eyes again."

(via An interview with Trent Parke - Try Hard Magazine)

"I have always been a storyteller and I am always working towards the book as the final work. It’s very hard to tell a story with those types of single stand-alone street images. I am interested in ideas. I am not interested in doing the same thing over and over again. The reason I take photographs is to make discoveries for myself. Always trying to piece together the puzzle, that’s where I get my rush. Once I find the answer I am looking for that’s usually it for a project, the excitement and energy is gone. I move onto something else, or away from that subject matter until I can view it with fresh eyes again."

(via An interview with Trent Parke - Try Hard Magazine)

It’s so, so important to be visible online because the lifespan of what you post is condensed down to days instead of weeks and months, especially because people are ingesting so much content. Create things all the time and post work on Tumblr, Instagram, wherever. Submit work to good art blogs, because that’s how people will find you. I have a European agent who found me on a photo blog where a friend of theirs posted my photos. It’s all about that now.
I don’t know your world," he said. "Only my world, and memories of the world before I went into the woods. What life is today? What is proper? I have to figure out how to live." He wished he could return to his camp—"I miss the woods"—but he knew by the rules of his release that this was impossible. "Sitting here in jail, I don’t like what I see in the society I’m about to enter. I don’t think I’m going to fit in. It’s too loud. Too colorful. The lack of aesthetics. The crudeness. The inanities. The trivia.
bandh:


It wasn’t until early 2013 that I really started to shift my camera lens toward other animal lovers. When I found myself in a photographic rut, I tried to focus my energy on the areas of interest that I enjoyed most in life, one of which was animals. I began traveling to niche animal shows—from ferret shows to dog shows—for a series that would later be titled “Welcome to the Show.”

(How I Got The Shot: Amy Lombard via B&H Explora)

bandh:

It wasn’t until early 2013 that I really started to shift my camera lens toward other animal lovers. When I found myself in a photographic rut, I tried to focus my energy on the areas of interest that I enjoyed most in life, one of which was animals. I began traveling to niche animal shows—from ferret shows to dog shows—for a series that would later be titled “Welcome to the Show.”

(How I Got The Shot: Amy Lombard via B&H Explora)

nonafaustine:

No one captured Harlem like James Van Der Zee. When you say Harlem the ghosts of yesterday still live in the hearts and minds of many. Conjuring this iconic image of a glamourous couple in raccoon coats, flossin beside their Cadillac. Upward moblility and the intellgencia grows out of the cracks between the concrete. Where even the street people debate politics, while the sounds of ole rhythm and blues oozes out of establishments on to the sidewalk. -Nona Photo, James Van Der Zee, 1932

nonafaustine:

No one captured Harlem like James Van Der Zee. When you say Harlem the ghosts of yesterday still live in the hearts and minds of many. Conjuring this iconic image of a glamourous couple in raccoon coats, flossin beside their Cadillac. Upward moblility and the intellgencia grows out of the cracks between the concrete. Where even the street people debate politics, while the sounds of ole rhythm and blues oozes out of establishments on to the sidewalk. -Nona 

Photo, James Van Der Zee, 1932

(via icpbardmfa)

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