Photographs on the Brain

Photographs on the Brain

Edited by Bryan Formhals

ZoomInfo
ZoomInfo

smbhmag:

'From the African Choir posing like Vogue models to an Abyssinian prince adopted by an explorer, a new exhibition spotlights the first black people ever photographed in Britain'

More here:

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/sep/15/hidden-histories-the-first-black-people-photographed-in-britain-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/sep/15/black-chronicles-ii-victorians-photography-exhibition-rivington-place?CMP=fb_gu

sinisterhumanists:


BUY THE BOOK

We’ve just published an art book/travelogue about our experience on the road making Empire. Designed by the geniuses at Atelier Carvalho Bernau, this thing is absolutely gorgeous, and includes new writing and behind-the-scenes photography, plus film stills and essays we wrote for Vice and The Creators Project, all wrapped in a really interesting reader interface that ties the writing in the book to the project’s online manifestation…. but if we say too much we might ruin it.

sinisterhumanists:

BUY THE BOOK

We’ve just published an art book/travelogue about our experience on the road making Empire. Designed by the geniuses at Atelier Carvalho Bernau, this thing is absolutely gorgeous, and includes new writing and behind-the-scenes photography, plus film stills and essays we wrote for Vice and The Creators Project, all wrapped in a really interesting reader interface that ties the writing in the book to the project’s online manifestation…. but if we say too much we might ruin it.

Preemptive personalization is seductive only because of the pressure we experience to make our identities unique — to win the game of having a self by being “more original” than other people. That goal stems in part from the social media battlefield, which itself reflects a neoliberal emphasis on entrepreneurializing the self, regarding oneself as leading an enterprise, not living a life. If “becoming yourself” was ever a countercultural goal, it isn’t anymore.
Photographs are being printed, rephotographed, the film is developed in ways usually not recommended (the temperature might be too high), prints are being made from that, etc. This process gives Yokota’s work its own look and feel. Or rather, it contributes a notable component to this look and feel. After all, the choice of subject matter, the framing, the use of artificial light (flash)… All of these choices, many of which appear to be random at first (but which are not), contribute to photographs that are unlike much of what we see in contemporary photography today. Where today’s popular New Formalism produces imagery that for the most part seems intent on outdoing itself in terms of its detached clinicality, of being devoid of much – if any – sensual passion, Yokota’s photographs live in the somber shadows, where all kinds of other, possibly unpleasant, surprises might linger.

"Sumimasen by IPG Project questions the concept of privacy and identity through Mayura (a pornographic actress living in Tokyo). By obscuring Mayura’s face with a mask, the photographers seek to challenge the very notion of identity. It is the face that misleadingly represents the essence of individuality. The use of a mask emphasises the idea that people need not reveal their faces to have their privacy breached. More than the face itself, it is a person’s actions that primarily define their identity."

(via Sumimasen by IPG Project – Éditions du LIC)

"Sumimasen by IPG Project questions the concept of privacy and identity through Mayura (a pornographic actress living in Tokyo). By obscuring Mayura’s face with a mask, the photographers seek to challenge the very notion of identity. It is the face that misleadingly represents the essence of individuality. The use of a mask emphasises the idea that people need not reveal their faces to have their privacy breached. More than the face itself, it is a person’s actions that primarily define their identity."

(via Sumimasen by IPG Project – Éditions du LIC)


"For whatever reason, this Petrov had turned an archivist’s eye on the banalities of an office building and a sky-top restaurant, which, though destroyed in one of history’s most photographed events, had hardly been photographed at all. The pictures were beautiful, too. Devoid of people, and suffused with premonitory gloom, they made art out of a site that most New Yorkers, at the time, had come to think of as an eyesore. Petrov seemed to be a kind of savant of the commonplace, as though he’d known that all of it would soon disappear down a smoking pit. Inadvertently or not, he left behind a ghostly record, apparently the only one, of this strange twentieth-century aerie, as though he’d been sent here for this purpose alone."

(via Konstantin Petrov’s World Trade Center Photographs)

"For whatever reason, this Petrov had turned an archivist’s eye on the banalities of an office building and a sky-top restaurant, which, though destroyed in one of history’s most photographed events, had hardly been photographed at all. The pictures were beautiful, too. Devoid of people, and suffused with premonitory gloom, they made art out of a site that most New Yorkers, at the time, had come to think of as an eyesore. Petrov seemed to be a kind of savant of the commonplace, as though he’d known that all of it would soon disappear down a smoking pit. Inadvertently or not, he left behind a ghostly record, apparently the only one, of this strange twentieth-century aerie, as though he’d been sent here for this purpose alone."

(via Konstantin Petrov’s World Trade Center Photographs)

The Internet threatens final confirmation of Adorno and Horkheimer’s dictum that the culture industry allows the “freedom to choose what is always the same.” Champions of online life promised a utopia of infinite availability: a “long tail” of perpetually in-stock products would revive interest in non-mainstream culture. One need not have read Astra Taylor and other critics to sense that this utopia has been slow in arriving. Culture appears more monolithic than ever, with a few gigantic corporations—Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon—presiding over unprecedented monopolies. Internet discourse has become tighter, more coercive. Search engines guide you away from peculiar words. (“Did you mean … ?”) Headlines have an authoritarian bark (“This Map of Planes in the Air Right Now Will Blow Your Mind”). “Most Read” lists at the top of Web sites imply that you should read the same stories everyone else is reading. Technology conspires with populism to create an ideologically vacant dictatorship of likes.
A crisis of authority is not for the faint of heart. It can be scary and weird and ambiguous. But it can be a lot of fun, too. The best and most authentic cultural products of our time manage to be all of those things. They imagine a world where no one is in charge and no one necessarily knows what’s going on, where identities are in perpetual flux. Mothers and fathers act like teenagers; little children are wise beyond their years. Girls light out for the territory and boys cloister themselves in secret gardens. We have more stories, pictures and arguments than we know what to do with, and each one of them presses on our attention with a claim of uniqueness, a demand to be recognized as special. The world is our playground, without a dad or a mom in sight.
Load more posts