Photographs on the Brain

Photographs on the Brain

Edited by Bryan Formhals

From where I stand now, there’s no certainty; nothing is fixed, everything changes. I think photography is a subjective act, one that relies on the descriptive nature of the real to give it its meaning. This is not too dissimilar to how history is written and how memory works – fragmentary, incomplete. For me borders are a manmade construct and through this construct an ideology is built around history and memory that leads people to identify or not with an idea of nation. This is particularly accentuated right now in the east of Europe, where histories are being reinterpreted. During my time in the Balkans and the Black Sea I began to see that every ‘side’ had their own perspective; each was telling their truth. So for me it was a question of a plurality of truths and realities. There are many layers of history, more questions than answers.
ekstasis:

(via @michaelmuseums: “The moment of discovery of Boy Wonder at Delphi July 1 1893 #Antinous #Hadrian My all time favourite archaeology pic”)

"The Delphi Antinous was found in July 1893 during the excavations done by the archaeologist Théophile Homolle and the École Française d’Athènes, close the temple of Apollo, and it was discovered still standing upright as seen in this photo taken as the statue was being unearthed.
The statue, lovingly polished for centuries, was, in some Barbarian incursion, toppled over, loosing both arms, Afterwards, however, it was gently raised and re-erected without its arms in another chapel further up the sacred way.
Sometime later, some followers of Antinous lovingly buried the statue, standing upright, to preserve it from being completely destroyed by Christian iconoclasts, after Theodosius I in 380 declared Christianity the only legitimate imperial religion and fostered the destruction of the Temple of Apollo of Delphi.
The site was completely destroyed by zealous Christians in an attempt to remove all traces of Paganism — and of the Religion of Antinous, the last of the Classical Gods…”
— from here

ekstasis:

(via @michaelmuseums: “The moment of discovery of Boy Wonder at Delphi July 1 1893 #Antinous #Hadrian My all time favourite archaeology pic”)

"The Delphi Antinous was found in July 1893 during the excavations done by the archaeologist Théophile Homolle and the École Française d’Athènes, close the temple of Apollo, and it was discovered still standing upright as seen in this photo taken as the statue was being unearthed.

The statue, lovingly polished for centuries, was, in some Barbarian incursion, toppled over, loosing both arms, Afterwards, however, it was gently raised and re-erected without its arms in another chapel further up the sacred way.

Sometime later, some followers of Antinous lovingly buried the statue, standing upright, to preserve it from being completely destroyed by Christian iconoclasts, after Theodosius I in 380 declared Christianity the only legitimate imperial religion and fostered the destruction of the Temple of Apollo of Delphi.

The site was completely destroyed by zealous Christians in an attempt to remove all traces of Paganism — and of the Religion of Antinous, the last of the Classical Gods…”

— from here

What I hadn’t figured out yet was that it’s OK not to be a genius, whatever that is, if there even is such a thing. Since then I’ve learned that the creative life may or may not be the apex of human civilization, but either way it’s not what I thought it was. It doesn’t make you special and sparkly. You don’t have to walk alone. You can work in an office — I’ve worked in offices for the past 15 years and written five novels while doing it. The creative life is forgiving: You can betray it all you want, again and again, and no matter how many times you do, it will always take you back.
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