Photographs on the Brain

Photographs on the Brain

Edited by Bryan Formhals

As blogs became more professional, they lost some of that craziness. I miss the early days when you could just get up a post about whatever and just kind of express yourself without really thinking about page views, thinking about SEO, thinking about how it will play on Twitter, if it’s shareable on Facebook … I do miss the sense that you were making it up as you went along. Now there’s a formula to things.
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archiemcphee:

Bristol, England-based professional photographer Justin Quinnell turned his own mouth into a pinhole camera. He built a tiny camera using aluminum foil and a 110 film cartridge and takes awesomely unusual photos with the device inside his mouth, held in place by his back teeth. Quinnell uses his homemade camera to take tonsil-vision shots of everything from scenic travel destinations, his own feet soaking in the bathtub, a visit to the dentist and even the nightmarish image of a dead spider resting on his toothbrush as it enters his mouth. Basically he photographs anything that he thinks will make his kids laugh.

Sometimes he had to hold his mouth open, standing still, in front of his target for up to a minute for the film to be properly exposed

He said: ‘I originally invented the camera for its indestructibility, throwing it off buildings and things like that. It was after a few months of using it this way I for some reason pushed it into my mouth. Three years of Degree level photographic theory rushed through my brain and mouthy imagery evolved.’

Visit Justin Quinnell’s website to check out more of his wonderfully peculiar oral pinhole photography.

[via 22 Words and the Daily Mail]

(via manyfacepalms)

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grahammacindoe:


                                        All In – Buying Into the Drug Trade

Photographs by Graham MacIndoe

The images in this series are of heroin baggies collected years ago during a period of addiction.

I became intrigued by the typography and design of the glassine envelopes used to package dope, stamped with references to popular culture like Twilight, Crooklyn and New Jack City. Dealers branded and marketed their product like entrepreneurs in any business, pairing names like Dead Medicine with a skull and crossbones to appeal to risk-takers, or an airplane labeled First Class to give the illusion of grandeur.

The addict becomes the ultimate consumer of the ultimate product — following a trail of quirky street names carefully chosen to be instantly recognizable to those in the know. But there is nothing hidden about the references to good times (So Amazing, True Romance, Gold Rush), juxtaposed with reminders of the gamble (9 Lives, Black Jack) and the reality of addiction (Flat Liner, Undertaker).

Lou Reed wrote the song “Perfect Day” to describe being on heroin, and that’s what every addict chases. But the marketing of that drug, like any product, doesn’t always lead us to what’s promised. These images are a reminder of both the power of desire and the things we as consumers want to believe will somehow change our lives. 

image

(via photographyprison)

fette:

Top, photograph by Luke Gilford, from the editorial L.A. Stories for V Magazine #79, Fall 2012. Via. Bottom, photograph by Adrees Latif/Reuters, A man is doused with milk after being hit with gas by security forces trying to disperse demonstrators protesting against the shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, August 2014. Via.
—
The police are dealing with many more media people who want to interact with protesters very closely. I think in some ways they have difficulty separating who’s a protester, who is a media person. I mean, they’re all running around with cameras.
Robert Cohen, staff photographer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Via.
—
So it comes as little surprise that some media-watchers are beginning to argue that the reporters on the ground have lost their objectivity and are now, consciously or not, aligning themselves with the protesters and against the police. As Politico’s Dylan Byers put it Tuesday, “Any journalist who stands on the front lines will inevitably be pushed, prodded or find themselves on the receiving end of a rubber bullet or tear-gas canister. In such an environment, it becomes near impossible not to identify with the protester.” Hot Air’s Noah Rothman, whose piece prompted Byers’ post, had gone even further. It is “clear that the press is no longer serving as objective chroniclers of the proceedings,” Rothman concluded after offering a few caveats about the media’s right to challenge authority. “In many ways, the media appears to believe that it is an active participant in the events in Missouri.”
Josh Voorhees, Why the Media Is Siding With the Protesters, for Slate, August 2014.

fette:

Top, photograph by Luke Gilford, from the editorial L.A. Stories for V Magazine #79, Fall 2012. Via. Bottom, photograph by Adrees Latif/Reuters, A man is doused with milk after being hit with gas by security forces trying to disperse demonstrators protesting against the shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, August 2014. Via.

The police are dealing with many more media people who want to interact with protesters very closely. I think in some ways they have difficulty separating who’s a protester, who is a media person. I mean, they’re all running around with cameras.

Robert Cohen, staff photographer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Via.

So it comes as little surprise that some media-watchers are beginning to argue that the reporters on the ground have lost their objectivity and are now, consciously or not, aligning themselves with the protesters and against the police. As Politico’s Dylan Byers put it Tuesday, “Any journalist who stands on the front lines will inevitably be pushed, prodded or find themselves on the receiving end of a rubber bullet or tear-gas canister. In such an environment, it becomes near impossible not to identify with the protester.” Hot Air’s Noah Rothman, whose piece prompted Byers’ post, had gone even further. It is “clear that the press is no longer serving as objective chroniclers of the proceedings,” Rothman concluded after offering a few caveats about the media’s right to challenge authority. “In many ways, the media appears to believe that it is an active participant in the events in Missouri.”

Josh Voorhees, Why the Media Is Siding With the Protesters, for Slate, August 2014.

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carlgunhouse:

What I Like (Erik Schubert on Mull It Over)

mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ERIK SCHUBERT: When I was a kid I really wanted to be a professional athlete. I especially wanted to be a baseball player or racecar driver, ideally both. I suppose that was a pretty common career choice for a young lad back in the ‘80s so my other thought was to be a tribal leader. Besides looking at Sports Illustrated, I was also a fan of National Geographic. Those NG photos of tribes looked pretty great. Nice weather, no need to worry about fashion, or money and my thinking was that once your basic needs are meet, you live pretty stress free.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

ES: The “what” is black and white photography. I’ve always seen myself as a color photographer, but recently I’ve brought B+W back into my art practice. The “who” is a pretty long list that shifts every now and then, but a few from the list are Jitka Hanzlova (I particularly love her older work, but the new work is pretty great too), Jochen Lempert, Bertrand Fleuret and Tobjørn Rødland books. I’d say I thought about how Rødland communicates through images, among other things, while working on the project and book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, Luis Gispert videos, and the band Beirut, who I can’t stop listing to especially when I’m editing photos.

JC: What are you up to right now?

ES: I just released my first artist book, How to Win Friends and Influence People with Lavalette, so I’m enjoying the fruits of my labor so to speak. Besides this, I’m always photographing for the pure joy of it, so I’m working on several different projects at the moment. One of which is a follow up to my recent publication. And besides those photo based projects, I’m working on some textile pieces as well that relate to How to Win Friends and Influence People.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

ES: Oh yes, I’d say that all the teachers I had in undergrad at Columbia College Chicago and grad school at MassArt made an impression on me, were mentors to me at various levels, and I always learned something from them. In grad school, Frank Gohlke and David Hilliard were great mentors and pretty important to me during that time. Particularly when I was going down this new trajectory with my art practice and at times felt vulnerable about it.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

ES: I’m based outside the Denver area. It’s been a great change from living in the city. It’s much closer in proximity to nature, which has been fruitful to my current work, but also much better for my psyche. I don’t feel or hear the constant noise of the art world, but if I’m in need of it, I can always drive up to Denver or hit up the Internet. So maybe a better summation would be that it allows me to feel more balanced.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

ES: Well, some general advice that couldn’t hurt any recent grads would be: Invest in your self by saving money. When applying to shows, grants, etc. employ the shotgun method. By this I mean, apply to as much stuff as possible, particularly if there are no entry fees. Really look for the no entry fee opportunities because some of these entry fees are just way too high. Invest in some nice, well-made, simple frames that you can reuse for group shows. And last but not least, have fun. I should really follow this advice to heart as well!

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

ES: Yes, I think it’s important to have a creative community, but also a community in general. I think we have different levels of community and some become more important than others during different times of our lives. During undergrad and grad school, participating primarily in a creative community was important to learn my practice and medium. Now it seems less important, even though I’m still part of communities. Now I’m learning new, maybe more complex, things from them, particularly about teaching. But this could change down the road.

JC: If all else fails, what is your plan B?

ES: There is no plan, I’m making it up as I go along—it’s social practice.

@mullitovercc

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"Sergio Romagnoli was killed in 1994. He was 37 years old. Despite an official investigation at the time and subsequent enquiries by his family, the circumstances surrounding his murder have never been fully explained and remain a mystery to this day. At the time of his murder, Sergio and his wife were living on Sao Tomè and Príncipe, a small island nation in the Gulf of Guinea off the West Coast of Central Africa. They had ventured there to do voluntary work in an orphanage for visually impaired children during a particularly tragic moment in their lives; following as it did, the recent death of their baby son Luigi, who had died after a serious illness at the age of one."

The result of many years work, the photographs gathered inA Drop In the Ocean date from the ’70s and ’80s and are but a few of the many thousands taken by the Italian Naturalist Sergio Romagnoli during his all too brief lifetime. The primary interest for the curators,Alessandro CalabreseandMilo Montelli, besides their natural human fascination for an incredible story, lay in the opportunity to interact with a rough body of images free of any artistic claim.

A DROP IN THE OCEAN BY ALESSANDRO CALABRESE & MILO MONTELLI

Published by ÉDITIONS DU LIC

Although Mr. Stanton has attracted a huge following, some photography experts suggest that there are limits to the impact of his content. Nina Berman, an associate professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and the photographer behind the book “Purple Hearts: Back From Iraq,” praised Mr. Stanton’s work but said that the travel series “doesn’t allow for any complexity, give you any historical information or any way to access the greater picture.” She added, “It’s a way to get news from a frightening, inaccessible place that seems safe and cozy.”
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